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Equine Rescue is our passion!

America's Equines At Risk Of Slaughter

In 2007, the slaughter of horses on US soil came to an end when a court ruling upheld a Texas law banning horse slaughter, and similar legislation was passed in Illinois. However, failure by the US Congress to pass legislation banning horse slaughter means that American horses  are still being slaughtered for human consumption abroad. Tens of thousands are shipped to Mexico and Canada annually, where they are killed under barbaric conditions so their meat  can continue to satisfy the palates of overseas diners in countries  such as Italy, France, Belgium and Japan. 


While a handful of horses are purposely sold into slaughter by irresponsible owners, most arrive at the slaughterhouse via livestock auction, where unsuspecting owners sell the animals to slaughterhouse middlemen known as “kill buyers.” Despite the fact that the US plants are no longer in operation, kill buyers continue to purchase and haul as many horses as possible from livestock auctions around the country to the slaughterhouses that have now relocated to Mexico and Canada. 


Wild horses are also  slaughtered since a 2004 backdoor Congressional rider gutted the protections afforded by the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. Now, the Bureau of Land  Management, the agency responsible for protecting wild horses, must sell “excess” horses (those 10 years of age or older, or not adopted  after three tries) at auction. As a result, wild horses are being removed from their range at an alarming rate with some being sold for slaughter. 


Castlewood Ranch Foundations, Inc. helps equines at risk of slaughter. While we will occasionally rescue barn cats, ranch dogs, and other farm animals in need, our primary focus is to pull equines and donkeys of all sexes, sizes, and sometimes pregnant from kill lots located in Texas where the boarder is just a quick haul away from Mexican Slaughter Houses.  Once here, 

we provide the necessary vet and hoof care, evaluation, and the sometimes needed training process begins.  Once a rescue has been assessed and determined ready for adoption, we actively seek out a home.  It is our goal to find the perfect fit for every animal and every family.    

Learn More

Are you interested in adopting a rescued horse, donkey or mini from Castlewood Ranch Foundation?  You can find our latest rescues available for adoption on our FB page by following the link below.  

Castlewood Ranch on FB

Adoptable Animals


The Adoption Process

Rio and his adoptive mom Leann.

FAQ's

How Does Castlewood  Ready Animals for Adoption?

After receiving a ranch animal we take a couple months evaluating their personality, training level, and any health concerns. Once we  feel we know the animal well enough to properly place them, we promote them on our FB page and with our rescue partners.   


How Does The Adoption Process  Work?

Once someone has contacted us about an animal, we invite them out for a meet-and-greet.  If there’s  a horse, donkey or mini they would like to pursue adopting, we have them fill out an application and discuss the home environment. We encourage potential adopters to visit the animal on site several times before finalizing any adoption. All adoptive families must sign an adoption agreement that include re-homing and breeding restrictions.


How Much Does It Cost To Adopt?

Adoption fees vary based on costs incurred during the rescue process, and any offsetting donations toward any one particular rescue.  We also factor the level of training and the amount of time the ranch placed in the animal to achieve that training. We only discuss adoption fees in person after an animal has bee selected for possible adoption. Our goal is to provide all the care needed, and to find good homes . We are a not-for-profit operation. Adoption fees are reasonable and usually significantly lower than purchasing a similarly trained horse or animal on the open market.


What Is the Typical Health Condition?

It  varies with each animal.  All equines receive shots and are wormed.  If they are underweight, they will not be adopted out until they have resumed normal weight.  Some have medical issues that are treatable.  Others may have chronic issues.  But most equines and ranch animals come to us in reasonably good with only minor  issues such as untrimmed hooves -which the Ranch remedies.  If there is a known medical condition, it will be disclosed as part of the adoption process.  

Adoption FORMS

Files coming soon.

Can't Adopt? Consider Sponsoring An Animal

We Need You!

Contact us about sponsoring a rescued equine today. Your monthly ongoing donation  toward one ranch animal helps with feed, farrier and ongoing vet costs while in our care.

    

Sponsors can visit their sponsored animal, and in some cases may be permitted to ride.  General sponsorships start at $50 per month.  Riding sponsorships start at $100. Enjoy the rewards of helping and interacting with a ranch animal pending adoption without the true cost of ownership.  


Contact Us About Sponsorship